Last edited by Faehn
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

7 edition of Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest found in the catalog.

Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest

by Robert H. Ruby

  • 274 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by A.H. Clark Co. in Spokane, Wash .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Northwest Coast of North America.,
  • Northwest, Pacific.
    • Subjects:
    • Slaveholders -- Northwest Coast of North America,
    • Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America,
    • Slaveholders -- Northwest, Pacific,
    • Indians of North America -- Northwest, Pacific

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-326) and index.

      Statementby Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown ; with a foreword by Jay Miller.
      SeriesNorthwest historical series ;, 17
      ContributionsBrown, John Arthur.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE78.N78 R83 1993
      The Physical Object
      Pagination336 p. :
      Number of Pages336
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1421653M
      ISBN 100870622250
      LC Control Number93031861

      Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest: Ruby, Robert H., Brown, John A.: Books - or: Robert H. Ruby, John A. Brown. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Northwest Historical Ser.: Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest by John A. Brown and Robert H. Ruby (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products!

        In the Pacific Northwest, elite marriages were often sealed by providing slaves. the Spanish crown outlawed Indian slavery under all circumstances. it's a difficult book . Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest (Book): Ruby, Robert H.

        Few people connect Washington Territory with slavery. However one incident in was a reminder that the peculiar institution reached the pre-Civil War Pacific Northwest. In the account below, historian Lorraine McConaghy describes the saga of Charles Mitchell whose attempted escape from slavery in a Read MoreCharles Mitchell, Slavery, and Washington Territory in People could be kept as slaves for religious purposes (Aztecs and Pacific Northwest Indians) or as a by-product of warfare, where they made little contribution to the economy or basic social structure (Eastern Woodlands). In other societies, slaves were central to the economy.


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Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest by Robert H. Ruby Download PDF EPUB FB2

The subject of this book is a surprising practice that most people don't know about: the Indian slave trade that existed throughout the Pacific Northwest before the arrival of Europeans and persisted into the late 19th century/5.

Native Americans in US, Canada, and the Far North. Early people of North America (during the ice years ago) Northeast Woodland Tribes and Nations - The Northeast Woodlands include all five great lakes as well as the Finger Lakes and the Saint Lawrence River.

Come explore the 3 sisters, longhouses, village life, the League of Nations, sacred trees, snowsnake games, wampum, the. Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest. Robert H. Ruby, John Arthur Brown. A.H. Clark Company, - History - pages.

0 Reviews. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents. Foreword by Jay Miller. Among some Pacific Northwest tribes, as many as one-fourth of the population were slaves. Since slavery was important economicly, it came as a tremendous blow to the society when emancipation was enforced in Alaska and farther south after.

Few first-person accounts of Indian slavery exist. Most of the information available comes from records kept by outsiders--white traders, missionaries, settlers, and government officials. In this work, Ruby and Brown incorporate material from all known reports about Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest.

The Pacific Northwest is no exception. Most people are unaware that African slavery came to this region in its earliest stages and contributed significantly to our political and cultural landscape. INDIANS AND SLAVERYINDIANS AND SLAVERY. Prior to contact with Europeans, American Indian groups throughout North America enslaved each other.

From the Pacific Northwest to the Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest book, large confederacies and alliances often targeted smaller societies and took captives for laborers, warriors, or kinspeople.

Many groups incorporated captives into their societies, and they generally did not. Among a few Pacific Northwest tribes, as many as one-fourth of the population were slaves. They were typically captured by raids on enemy tribes, or purchased on inter-tribal slave markets.

Slaves would sometimes be killed in potlatches, to signify the owners' contempt for property. European enslavement of Native Americans. The Pacific Northwest Coast at one time had the most densely populated areas of indigenous people ever recorded in Canada. The land and waters provided rich natural resources through cedar and salmon, and highly structured cultures developed from relatively dense populations.

Within the Pacific Northwest, many different nations developed, each with their own distinct history, culture, and society. Long before the transatlantic African slave trade was established in North America, Europeans were conducting a transatlantic trade of enslaved Native Americans, beginning with Christopher Columbus on Haiti in European colonists used the enslavement of Indians as a weapon of war while the Native Americans themselves used enslavement as a tactic for survival.

Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest (NORTHWEST HISTORICAL SERIES) [Ruby, Robert H., Brown, John A.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest (NORTHWEST HISTORICAL SERIES)Cited by: 6.

The French were not primarily interested in the Pacific northwest, and consequently give little evidence as to the exist ence of Indian slavery in the Oregon territory.

They, how ever, practiced Indian slavery in the Illinois country. In this slavery was legally authorized by edict for Canada where.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ruby, Robert H. Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest. Spokane, Wash.: A.H. Clark Co., (OCoLC) Slavery Among Pacific Northwest Native Americans.

McIlwraith's book "The Bella Coola Indians" contains numerous stories about people becoming slaves, and the reasons are often quite different. In one story, a woman's husband sells her as a slave, then her family buys her back, then he shows up to claim his wife, then sells her again, and.

Slavery Among the Irul,ians of Northwest America nation on the coast to the southeast of them at a great distance. Like other Indian nations, they adopt their slaves in their families and treat. Indeed, Spain was to Indian slavery what Portugal and later England were to African slavery. Ironically, Spain was the first imperial power to formally discuss and recognize the humanity of Indians.

Northwest Coast Indian - Northwest Coast Indian - Stratification and social structure: The Northwest Coast was the outstanding exception to the anthropological truism that hunting and gathering cultures—or, in this case, fishing and gathering cultures—are characterized by simple technologies, sparse possessions, and small egalitarian bands.

Indian slavery in the Pacific Northwest by Robert H. Ruby,A.H. Clark Co. edition, in EnglishCited by: 6. The Pacific Northwest Indian peoples often organized themselves into corporate “houses” of a few dozen to or more related people who held in common the rights to particular resources.

As with the “noble house” societies of medieval Japan and Europe, social stratification operated at every level of many Northwest Coast societies. Slavery among the Indians of the Northwest: As documented by early explorers - Kindle edition by Vanderburg~Kemnow, La Vaughn.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Slavery among the Indians of the Northwest: As documented by early s: 3.

Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest from footnote at the bottom of page 35 In early Octoberat the beginning of the war, part of the Osages, Seminoles, Shawnees and Quapaws signed treaties with the Confederacy as did the Cherokees on October 7,   Robert H.

Ruby and John A. Brown, Indian Slavery in the Pacific Northwest Indian Territory: Barbara Krauthamer, Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery.Inappropriate The list (including its title or description) facilitates illegal activity, or contains hate speech or ad hominem attacks on a fellow Goodreads member or author.

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